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Published On: Fri, Jun 16th, 2017

The Great Freshman Dropout Rate

The Numbers

The United States is among the most developed nations in the world. It has strong technological development and an even stronger currency. It is highly paradoxical, then, that about 41% of first-year college students did not complete their studies. One article looks at the reasons behind this.

The fact that the U.S. was ranked in the top ten most developed countries in the world and more than a third of its students not completing their first year of college is disturbing. It begs the question, why are these students not completing their studies? And, what kind of an impact does this have on the job market?

photo pixabay

The Dropout Factory

This harsh, albeit accurate nickname was assigned to the United States based on the numbers stated above. Although this does not mean that dropping out of college does not guarantee someone a job (indeed, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that approximately two-thirds of American adults do not have a college degree), this does raise the question of whether this is a factor in job outsourcing.

Common Reasons Behind the Dropout

The two most common reasons for dropping out of college are financial troubles (38% of dropouts) and failing grades (28% of dropouts).

The cost of tuition, room, board, and books may seem insurmountable to someone entering their first year of college. Although the cost of college depends on a variety of factors, the College Board reported that, for the 2016-2017 school year, students were expected to pay anywhere from $9,650 to $33,480 for one year of education.

In terms of actually completing the classes, students find themselves studying material that demands much more of them. Classes in college are taught in a way that is quite different from classes in high school, and this change can be stressful to some students. Statistics show that 60% of first-year students take remedial classes. Of those 60%, 75% never complete their courses.

photo: TaxRebate.org.uk

Overlooked Stressors

Some other stressors that are sometimes overlooked are freedom and lack of persistence.

Going off to college gives students unprecedented freedom. They are able to choose their class schedules, whether or not they attend the classes. U.S. News found that such a vast variety of choices, coupled with comparatively less guidance than students had in high school, sets students up to not complete their degrees.

Finally, college students enter their first year with dreams of changing the world and becoming famous. They aspire to be as well-known as software developer Bill Gates or CEO Steve Jobs. While these dreams may fuel them for a while, reality eventually sets in. When students become discouraged, they lose the drive to do well in school and, eventually, drop out.

Help with Stressors

If you find yourself in need of professional mental health help, there are many resources available for you.

As an example, BetterHelp is a company that online counseling and therapy.

This is a company that strives to provide mental health help for those who want to avoid the stigma associated with seeking help for illnesses that cannot be readily observed. This company and the people in it are very professional with credentials, truly affordable, and very convenient. Find out more about them at their website.  

Author: Marie Miguel

About the Author

- Outside contributors to the Dispatch are always welcome to offer their unique voices, contradictory opinions or presentation of information not included on the site.

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