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Published On: Tue, Mar 22nd, 2016

Bill Clinton was criticizing the GOP when he bashed the ‘awful legacy of the last eight years’

Former President Bill Clinton attacked the “awful legacy of the last eight years” during a campaign appearance for his wife, Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton, in Washington state Monday.  Immediately critics pointed out how President Obama has been in charge, in part with a Democratic Congress during the first few years. The campaign put out a statement claiming the former President meant the GOP.

photo/ donkeyhotey

photo/ donkeyhotey

Clinton made the remarks at an event in Spokane ahead of Saturday’s Washington state Democratic caucuses.

“If you believe we’ve finally come to the point where we can put the awful legacy of the last eight years behind us,” Clinton said, “and the seven years before that when we were practicing trickle-down economics and no regulation in Washington, which is what caused the crash, then you should vote for her.”

During that timeline administration Hillary Clinton served as secretary of state and whose policies she has defended in her primary campaign against Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Republicans quickly seized on the statement, posting a video of the remarks to YouTube, prompting a response from the Clinton campaign.

Clinton spokesman told USA Today that the former president was referring to Republicans in Congress with his “awful legacy” remark.

“After President Obama was elected, Republicans made it their number one goal to block him at every turn,” spokesman Angel Urena said. “That unprecedented obstruction these last eight years is their legacy, and the American people should reject it by electing Hillary Clinton to build on President Obama’s success so we can all grow and succeed together.”

Clinton has a lead of more than 300 delegates over Sanders in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination from primaries and caucuses following a sweep of five states March 15. Alaska and Hawaii also hold Democratic caucuses on Saturday, but Washington has the most delegates ultimately at stake with 101.

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- Writer and Co-Founder of The Global Dispatch, Brandon has been covering news, offering commentary for years, beginning professionally in 2003 on Crazed Fanboy before expanding into other blogs and sites. Appearing on several radio shows, Brandon has hosted Dispatch Radio, written his first novel (The Rise of the Templar) and completed the three years Global University program in Ministerial Studies to be a pastor. To Contact Brandon email [email protected] ATTN: BRANDON

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  1. Reid Barnes says:

    So now Former President Bill Clinton said “put the awful legacy of the last eight years behind us.” I wondered how Hillary would pivot after hanging close to Obama while appealing to Black voters in the Southern primaries. Then he added, “and the seven years before that where we were practicing trickle-down economics with no regulation in Washington, which is what caused the crash.”

    Obama, Clinton, and Sanders were only U.S. Senators when the financial collapse in 2008 occurred. Remember that I said this. I’m coming back to it.

    It is generally understood (even by both Republicans and Democrats) that the financial collapse in 2008 occurred as a result of the U.S. residential real estate market collapse. Although residential mortgage backed securities were considered the most conservative investment that could be made by a financial institution, it was the residential real estate market collapse that placed these investments, mortgage backed securities, at risk on a grand scale.

    The size of the U.S. residential real estate market is enormous. It was probably the largest single market in existence, ever, at the time, measured in money. Money was supplied through government backed lending, especially loans either guarantied or ultimately purchased by Fannie and Freddy. When someone buys a house and there is a closing, the buyers pay the purchase price, but where did all that money come from to buy the house? Demand is measured in terms of actual buyers; where did actual buyers come from with enough money to drive the price of houses in a market as enormous as the U.S. housing market to a tipping point followed by collapse?

    When there was a buyer, it meant someone got a loan. Before a lender lends they make sure the loan will be paid back. When the government guarantees a loan, that makes the lender sure, and that seals the lender’s decision. If a loan originator can originate a loan and sell it to an investor, they do it. The investors that drove the housing demand to the peak were named Fannie and Freddy.

    Obama, Clinton, and Sanders were only U.S. Senators at the time of the collapse, and Bush was President. But it was a stream of federal legislation that produced the dynamics of that U.S. housing market, passed by U.S. Senators, and no Senator voted for the policies that produced the collapse of the U.S. housing market more than Obama, Clinton and Sanders. And when you blame Bush you are more or less blaming him for not vetoing something Obama and Clinton and Sanders voted for. Former Congressman Artur Davis, the first to endorse Obama for President, actually apologized for those policies.

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