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Published On: Sun, Sep 8th, 2013

Wheat seed resistant to Ug99 launched in Kenya

Kenya’s Eldoret University debuted two new varieties of disease-resistant wheat to the nation’s farmers with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), according to a press release Friday.

Global presence of Ug99 stem rust 2011 Public domain image/George Weller via Wikimedia Commons

Global presence of Ug99 stem rust 2011
Public domain image/George Weller via Wikimedia Commons

According to the FAO,  thousands of Kenyan farmers have visited Eldoret University in western Kenya for a two-day agriculture fair highlighting the latest farming technologies.

Wheat stem rust was under control for over 30 years, but a resurgence of the disease was discovered in 1999 in Uganda that swiftly spread to neighboring Kenya.

The wheat stem rust, caused by the strain of the fungus known as Ug99 named after its place and year of origin, has since spread to Iran, Yemen and South Africa and threatens crops as far away as India as spores are carried by wind. Parasitic rusts threaten global wheat production, reducing plant growth and crop yields. The disease can destroy up to 70-100 percent of the yield of wheat crop if not prevented.

“Improving food security in developing countries through the use of nuclear techniques is an important priority of the IAEA,” said IAEA Director-General Yukiya Amano. “I am pleased that we have been able to make an important contribution to fighting wheat stem rust.”

Wheat rusts, particularly the Ug99 strain, are a major threat to food security because rust epidemics can result in devastating yield losses. This international project involving affected countries, plant scientists and breeders and international organizations is a major breakthrough. It clearly shows the benefits of FAO/IAEA collaboration and that working together we can overcome the challenges we face,” said FAO Director-General Jose Graziano da Silva.

The rust-resistant wheat varieties were developed with the support of an IAEA technical cooperation project, Responding to the Transboundary Threat of Wheat Black Stem Rust (Ug99), which involved more than 20 nations and international organizations.

The varieties were developed using a nuclear technique for crop improvement known as mutation breeding. By exposing seeds, or plant tissue, to radiation, scientists accelerate the natural process of mutation, and then breeders are able to select and develop new varieties.

In 2009, Miriam Kinyua, a Kenyan plant breeder, sent 10 kilograms of five varieties of wheat seed to the FAO/IAEA laboratories in Seibersdorf, south of Vienna, where they were irradiated for mutation breeding.

These seeds were returned to Kenya where they were planted in a hot spot for the disease for screening and selection. Kinyua and her colleagues at the University of Eldoret’s Biotechnology Department identified eight lines resistant to Ug99. Four of these lines were submitted to Kenyan national performance trials, and two were officially approved as varieties by the national committee of the Ministry of Agriculture.

About six tons of seeds of the new varieties will be made available this month for the next planting season in Kenya.

FAO Press Release

 

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About the Author

- Writer, Co-Founder and Executive Editor of The Global Dispatch. Robert has been covering news in the areas of health, world news and politics for a variety of online news sources. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the website, Outbreak News Today and hosts the podcast, Outbreak News Interviews on iTunes, Stitcher and Spotify Robert is politically Independent and a born again Christian Follow @bactiman63

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  1. Wheat seed resistant to Ug99 launched in Kenya ... says:

    […] Kenya’s Eldoret University debuted two new varieties of disease-resistant wheat to the nation’s farmers with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), according to a press release Friday.  […]

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