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Published On: Wed, Apr 25th, 2018

What You Should Know About Home Depot Equipment Rental Services

If you are the type of person who likes to take projects into his own hands without hiring any contractors, you surely know the importance of utilizing the right tools. Moreover, you probably know that certain jobs – like reinforcing and isolating walls, building pillars, digging holes for sump dumps – require specialized tools that are not usually available at every counter hardware store.

From a cost and space perspective, if you are not running a contracting business, it is virtually impossible (not to mention totally redundant) to own every single tool. Instead of wasting time trying to needlessly tackle building tasks with the wrong tools, you could instead rent the necessary equipment for a predefined period of time. For this purpose, Home Depot offers one of the best-renting services on the market. But before pulling your credit card out of the wallet, there are a few pieces of information you should be aware of. Here is what you should know about home depot equipment rental services.

photo/ Русский, pixabay user Sid74

Why Rent the Equipment Instead of Purchasing It?

Regardless of the level of experience for building projects, we all know that some tasks require complex pieces of equipment, most of which are extremely expensive. If you choose to buy the equipment instead of renting it for a predetermined period of time, you could risk unnecessarily inflating the final costs of the project. Instead of throwing money on equipment that you will use once, at most twice after finishing your building project, renting it is the more sensible option from a long term financial perspective.

As for Home Depot’s tool offer, the catalog contains a wide variety of instruments, some of which are so obscure and niche that even the most experienced builders probably never heard of them. For a full list of tools, you can always consult specialized sources such as EquipmentRental.org, which offers comprehensive renting guides on a consistent basis.

Home Depot Equipment Renting Policy

Now that we have covered the rationale behind renting instead of outright purchasing the equipment, it is time to talk about the store’s renting policy. First off, Home Depot offers an (entirely optional) damage protection service that reliefs the customer from the obligation of covering the full price of the tools in case they suffer damages of an accidental nature. The charge (which, again, is totally optional) is quite generous – it represents 10 % of the initial renting price. You will receive a separate bill at the end of the renting period.

However, there is a catch: this service does not cover the customer if the equipment suffers damages due to neglect, intentional acts of sabotage, misuse, or a failure to follow the instructions guidebook that comes with every price of equipment. Therefore, before renting a tool, make sure you and your partners have a basic understanding about how the tool functions and how to maintain it.

How to Rent Equipment from Home Depot and Catalogue Offer

Once you are fully familiarized with the store’s renting policy, it is time to actually rent the required tools. To rent, find a store employee and tell them, in general lines, what home project you are intending to engage in. You will be glad to find out that all Home Depot employees are trained and instructed to provide clients with relevant information, make accurate recommendations, explain how each particular tool functions and how to set it up. If you still can’t manage to properly install the equipment, Home Depot employees will be more than happy to assist you in any way.

Now that you have decided which tools you need, you will need to set the renting period and pay the deposit. If it is a small scale job, you can rent the equipment for as little as 4 hours. If you have your act together, finish the job in a timely fashion and return it before the renting period ends, you can save a lot of money. Otherwise, if the project is more complex, you can rent the equipment either for 24 hours, or several days.

For exterior renovating or maintenance projects, Home Depot’s equipment assortment contains drywall lifts, drywall sanders, paint, texture sprayers and the list goes on. Since these jobs can be quite dangerous, you can also rent safety equipment such as high-quality ladders made out of aluminum or fiberglass.  

As for other niche, specific equipment, Home Depot also offers the option of renting large-scale equipment, like chipper shredders, skid steers, trenchers and even mini-excavators. However, the renting costs for these particular equipment pieces are, obviously, quite high, and it is unlikely that they are frequently rented by people who do not own construction businesses. Nevertheless, the fact that Home Depot lets you rent these complicated pieces of equipment is laudable.

Conclusion

Whether you are planning to engage in a large-scale project or not, renting the necessary tools is the more sensible option from a financial perspective than outright purchasing them for personal use. Chances are you will never need a mini-excavator, a shredder or a jackhammer again (unless you are the type who like to occasionally upgrade the house), so it makes no sense in wasting precious storage space and spending money maintaining them.

Thankfully, Home Depot offers a very generous renting package for this exact purpose. Furthermore, by renting instead of buying, you can save tons of cash that you could invest in better building materials and fixtures. Finally, before renting a particular equipment piece, make sure to familiarize yourself with their renting policies and catalog.

Author: Len McCluskey

About the Author

- Outside contributors to the Dispatch are always welcome to offer their unique voices, contradictory opinions or presentation of information not included on the site.

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