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Published On: Wed, Apr 15th, 2020

The 4 Signs of a Failing Business

Business is risky regardless of what you’re going to specialize in. A business that looks like it’s doing alright at first glance might be struggling behind the scenes. This is important to know if you’re working with this company or they owe you a debt. But what are the signs of a failing business?

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The Red Flags of a Failing Business

The biggest problem when a business starts to go under and fail, is that they tend to keep it a secret from everyone they’re working or partnered with. One day you might be getting regular payments from them, and none the following days. A failing business can be extremely difficult to spot unless you know where to look. So we’ve come up with a list of things you can identify to figure out the business you’re partnered with is starting to go under. 

Mass Layoffs and Lack of New Hires

Mass layoffs is the most obvious sign that a business is doing poorly. One moment their staff is a thousand strong, the next it’s a skeleton crew of seven hundred. Just barely enough to run the business with as little cost as possible. There will also be very few attempts to gain new staff to replace those lost as well. They simply can’t afford to have new people to expand, when their business is running on fumes.

This is one of the last ditch efforts of the business to turn over a profit and recover. However, once it’s gotten to this point, bankruptcy soon follows. 

Poor Advertising and Media Presence

Advertising and making sure that the masses know you exist is an important part of running a business. However, if a business either has very little media exposure or very negative exposure then you know there’s a problem. 

The former means that they have very little budget to afford a marketing campaign which is essential for a business’ growth. The latter means that they’re cutting corners and trying to salvage what they can. Either way, their business is struggling.

Innovation is Halted

One of the most important things to do in a business is innovate and bring something new to the table. However, a failing business will almost never create new things and simply be content with using their old strategies. The main reason for this is because innovation is a risk. 

When a business is at the point of bankruptcy and going under, they can rarely afford to make mistakes like taking an uncertain risk. If they take the risk and they fail, then they’re just digging their own grave. So if you see a business is starting to stagnate and nothing new is coming from them, then it might be a sign that you need to dig deeper.

Their Payments Start Coming in Late 

This is the most common thing that happens when a business starts to fail. The failing business will start chopping people off and either paying them late, or not at all. Staffing and recruiting firms are one of the first to be cut off as their services are considered non-essential to a failing business. The best solution here is to confront them early and get your fees as soon as possible.

The later you take action, the higher the risk of them disappearing off the face of the earth, leaving you with an unpaid debt. The best way to handle this to get the help of an excellent collections company like Staffing Debt.

Author: Roel Calatin

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