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Published On: Wed, Mar 23rd, 2016

Taking Landscape Photos Like a Pro

Isn’t it great to capture through photos the beauty of every place you visit exactly the way you see it? How about enhancing the beauty of a certain place through your photo? This is where knowledge about taking landscape photos like a professional will come in handy. It allows you to bring to life the scenes you see and envision. You can also turn an otherwise drab location into something eye-catching and interesting. Below are some tips on how to shoot your landscape photos like a pro:

Scan the place for the best camera angle.

If you have just visited the location, look around the place and see it from different camera angles or vantage points. Plan your shots according to your desired effect and mood. Some of the things that you might want to include in visualizing the shot that you want are the lighting, movement of the elements in the place (like bodies of water flowing or trees being blown by the wind), and features unique to the place like heat waves in the desert.

Use the Rule of Thirds

Following the rule of thirds involves breaking down the image into thirds both horizontally and vertically, which results into nine parts. Look for the four crosses formed in the middle of the grid and the four lines intersecting each other. The former serve as a guide for positioning your points of interest, while the points of intersection of the four lines can be used in deciding where to place the elements of your photo and which parts of the scene to include for a more balanced look.

a sunflower field Photo by Bruce FritzUse a tripod to ensure high-quality photos.

This is a tip that even professionals still swear by. The late world-renowned nature photographer Fritz Polking was once even quoted saying that “nature photography is not possiblewithout a tripod.” Aside from providing a stable base that makes for sharper shots, a tripod also allows you to capture scenes during sunset and at night. If you use neutral density filters to balance light and movement when shooting running water, using a tripod will help you achieve the effect that you want more effectively.

Using a tripod even allows you to adjust your shutter speed, aperture, and ISO to your desired levels when shooting architecture. If your camera is heavy, using this accessory is a big help, too. For camera related accessories, online store like Adorama can help you find the right one.

Review your shots before leaving the location.

Lastly, make sure that you review your shots. You might want to check if the frame of your shots are clean or if there are elements that should not be present in the picture. Use your camera’s histogram to check the white balance, brightness, and contrast of the shots to see if anything needs adjustment. Doing this while still on location will at least afford you time to redo the shots if necessary.

Liz Pekler is a travel photographer with almost 10 years of experience in the field. When she is not out exploring the world, she likes to share her knowledge about photography and travel through writing for blogs.

Guest Author: Lolita Di

Photo by Scott Bauer Agricultural Research Services

Photo by Scott Bauer Agricultural Research Services

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  1. Jesse Jones Park announces April programs, events says:

    […] Taking Landscape Photos Like a Pro Below are some tips on how to shoot your landscape photos like a pro: Scan the place for the best camera angle. If you have just visited the location, look around the place and see it from different camera angles or vantage points. Plan your shots … Read more on The Global Dispatch […]

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