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Published On: Thu, Sep 10th, 2015

Reasons Reducing Car Accidents Means Addressing the Human Factor

Human error is usually the reason most people get into car accidents. Here are some tips to prevent mistakes and avoid the most common factors for crashes.

Never Drink And Drive

Never drink and drive. This should be obvious, and in many ways, it is. It’s illegal in every state, and yet many people still do it. Maybe you don’t have a ride home or you didn’t plan how to get home in advance. Maybe you’re pressured into drinking every time you go out for a night on the town.

Nearly one third of all vehicle accidents occur because of drunk driving. Even if you think you’re under the legal limit, it can still affect your driving. And, if you get into an accident while under the influence, you can still be charged. Your slower reaction times will make it more difficult to drive and anticipate other drivers and pedestrians.

So, if you are going to be drinking, take it easy and call a cab – or, get a ride home with a friend.

Never Drive While Texting or Talking On The Phone

Texting or talking on the phone while driving can be just as bad, or worse, than driving while drunk. According to one report, texting while driving is worse than driving while intoxicated.

Put the phone down, put it on vibrate, or turn it off when you drive if you feel an insatiable urge to answer every bleep, bloop, and buzz.

Get Plenty Of Sleep

Another report shows that driving while drowsy can be just as dangerous as driving while drunk. This  Long Island, nearly everyone alive today will be involved in at least one car accident in their lifetime. And, many of those accidents will involve people driving while impaired in some manner.

Most people think about and understand the dangers of driving while drunk. And, many people realize that texting and driving don’t mix either. But, some people are having trouble waking up to the idea that driving while sleep deprived can be fatal.

Experts recommend getting at least 8 to 9 hours of quality sleep every night. If you’re sleep deprived, you will probably have to play catch up by making up your sleep debt over the weekend. Then, make a commitment to get to bed earlier.

Rough Road Sign public domain

Rough Road Sign public domain

Drive Slower In Bad Weather

Drive slower in bad weather. Many people find themselves rushing when the weather turns south. But, the worst time to be in a hurry is when it’s raining or snowing. A general rule of thumb is to drive 10 MPH under the speed limit – at least – when the road conditions change (i.e. ice or snow). You may have to slow considerably, reducing speed to between 5 and 15 MPH.

Be Patient

Most people drive like this is the last time they will ever drive – they rush red lights, turn corners like they’re in the Indy 500, and pay little attention to other drivers or pedestrians. Maybe you get distracted easily. Maybe you’re a naturally impatient person.

It takes a lot of thought, discipline, and control to slow down and think before you act on the road. Practice being patient. If you’re constantly late for your appointments or meetings, or for work, you need to leave earlier. Budget your time.

At the end of the day, reckless driving isn’t worth it.

Guest Author :

Victoria Gault has worked for years in health and safety. she likes to share her insights online and has also posted on other health and safety related websites and blogs.

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