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Published On: Thu, Jun 14th, 2012

Egypt court rules to dissolve parliament

The Egyptian political process continues to be riddled with controversy as the elected officials have been disqualified and the lower house of parliament dissolved.

Men with a sign depicting Hosni Mubarak as a monster. January 2011 Photo/Mona via wikimedia commons

CBS reports that the Egyptian court ruled on Thursday that one third of the seats in the  Islamist-dominated parliament were invalid, stirring fresh uncertainty in the politically divided country.

The report explains that the Supreme Constitutional Court’s ruling escalates the power struggle between the Muslim Brotherhood and the military, which stepped in to rule after Mubarak’s fall.

The decisions tip the contest dramatically in favor of the ruling generals, robbing the Brotherhood of its power base in parliament and boosting Ahmad Shafiq, the former Mubarak prime minister who many see as the military’s favorite in the presidential contest against the Brotherhood’s candidate, the report says.

The court descision explicitly states that the entire parliament is dismissed because of “constitutional violations” and that the military body will regain legislative authority and form a new constituent assembly on Friday.

The parliament had been elected on a complex electoral system in which voters cast ballots for party lists which made up two thirds of parliament, and also for individual candidates for the remaining seats in the lower house.

Shafiq welcomed the court rulings in a conference before his supporters, saying an “era of political score settling” was over. 

“The message of this historic verdict is that the era of political score settling has ended,” Shafik told cheering
crowd in Cairo. “The constitutional court has confirmed my right to participate in the election and reinforced the
legitimacy of this election.”

Rawya Rageh said it was “really a victory speech … addressing Egyptians almost as president and not as a candidate”.

He praised the military, she noted, and said that the “era of fear-mongering was over”.

At the same time, he also tried to reach out to supporters of opposition groups, notably the Muslim Brotherhood and liberal youth protesters.

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About the Author

- Writer and Co-Founder of The Global Dispatch, Brandon has been covering news, offering commentary for years, beginning professionally in 2003 on Crazed Fanboy before expanding into other blogs and sites. Appearing on several radio shows, Brandon has hosted Dispatch Radio, written his first novel (The Rise of the Templar) and completed the three years Global University program in Ministerial Studies to be a pastor. To Contact Brandon email [email protected] ATTN: BRANDON

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  1. VP Joe Biden praises Arab Spring as democratic movement - The Global Dispatch says:

    […] ceremony in Virginia on Thursday, called the Arab Spring a “democratic movement”–on the same day that the Egyptian high court nullified the Islamist majority parliament and the Egyptian mi… CNS video […]

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