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Published On: Wed, Oct 31st, 2018

Chicago Street Gang, Goonie Boss members Charged with Multiple Murders

A joint federal and state investigation has resulted in racketeering and murder charges against five alleged members of a Chicago street gang faction known as the Goonie Boss.  The charges allege that Goonie members and their associates terrorized the Englewood neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side and were responsible for a total of eleven murders.

A federal racketeering indictment returned Thursday in U.S. District Court in Chicago charges four of the alleged Goonie members with participating in a criminal organization that murdered its rivals, intimidated witnesses to crimes, and publicly boasted about their gang activities on social media.  The federal racketeering indictment charges ten murders, six attempted murders, and two assaults.  The four federal defendants are in custody, and their arraignments in federal court have not yet been scheduled.

A fifth Goonie member was charged in state court with committing the eleventh murder.  He is in custody and will appear in Cook County Criminal Court at a later date.

The charges were announced by John R. Lausch, Jr., United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; Kimberly M. Foxx, Cook County State’s Attorney; Jeffrey S. Sallet, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; and Eddie T. Johnson, Superintendent of the Chicago Police Department.

The federal indictment charges four Goonie members with racketeering conspiracy: ROMEO BLACKMAN, 22; TERRANCE SMITH, 22; JOLICIOUS TURMAN, 27; and NATHANIEL MCELROY, 21; all of Chicago.  The indictment describes Blackman as the leader of the gang who personally oversaw and directed its illegal activities.

The federal charges allege that the Goonie gang has been involved in a longstanding, violent feud with several rival gang factions in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago.  During this conflict, Goonie members and their associates allegedly murdered and assaulted rivals, stole firearms to arm themselves, and violently prevented witnesses from cooperating with law enforcement.  Goonie members posted comments, photographs and videos on the Facebook Live application, openly proclaiming their membership in the gang and boasting about its violent acts, the indictment states.

Racketeering conspiracy generally carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, but a sentence of life in prison or the death penalty is possible for certain underlying racketeering activities, including certain murders charged in the indictment.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Albert Berry III of the Northern District of Illinois, and Cook County Assistant State’s Attorneys Yvette Loizon and Ethan Holland, who serve as Special Assistant U.S. Attorneys, represent the government in the federal case.

CHRISTIAN SIVELS, 19, of Chicago, is charged with first-degree murder in the killing of David Easley, 26, on May 21, 2016.  Easley was shot and killed while walking in the 7000 block of South Carpenter Street in the Englewood neighborhood.

Sivels will appear at a later date in Cook County Criminal Court.  The first-degree murder charge is punishable by a sentencing range of 45 years to life in prison.  The People of the State of Illinois are represented by Assistant State’s Attorneys Michael Golden, Ethan Holland, Yvette Loizon and Maureen McCurry.

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