Quantcast
Published On: Wed, Jan 21st, 2015

An introduction to traditional Dim Sum

If you enjoy Cantonese cuisine you will have probably tried dim sum before. This is a popular dish, which consists of steamed dumplings that are filled with a variation of tasty ingredients. The portions are individual and usually served in small steamer baskets. Traditionally in Hong Kong many restaurants start serving incredibly early and close in the early afternoon. Originally Dim Sum is linked to the Chinese tradition of “Yum Cha” or drinking tea.

Also the term dim sum is translated to ‘touch your heart’ or ‘little heart, the legend saying that once you have finished reading this post I am sure you will see why the reference is a suitable one.

photo supplied Mott32

photo supplied Mott32

Dim Sum Etiquette

Now that I have explained what is dim sum, let’s take a look at some basic etiquette you should follow when enjoying this dish…

Ordering – Don’t worry; the server with the steamed rice roll cart will make their way to you. They will generally carry two or three dishes for you to choose from. You can of course have one of each. If you don’t see the dish you were hoping to enjoy, don’t be afraid to ask. A lot of restaurants will happily accommodate your wishes and bring you one straight from the kitchen.

Start with tea – Before you tuck into the best dim sum in Hong Kong you should enjoy the pot of tea that will be given to you when you sit down. Some restaurants even have different flavoured teas for you to select from. If you finish the pot of tea and would like a refill all you need to do is leave the lid ajar or turn it upside down to let the waiter know.

Share – Dim sum is one of the best dishes to share. The more people you dine with, the more dim sum dishes you will be able to order, and the more you will enjoy your dining experience.

assorted dim sum photo supplied by Mott32

assorted dim sum photo supplied by Mott32

Famous Dim Sum Dishes

You should definitely consider ordering one of the following famous dim sum dishes if you pay a visit to Mott32:

Dim sum – Originally dim sum was intended to be a teatime snack consisting of a group of small dishes. However, thanks to the popularity of dim sum, it is now served throughout the entire day in restaurants all over Hong Kong.

Buns – Dim sum buns can be either steamed or baked. They are made from wheat flour and have a fluffy texture. From sweet bean pastes to meat, they are filled with a variation of delicious ingredients.

Dumplings – Dumplings are another popular dim sum dish. Served either fried or steamed, a dumpling consists of a filling that is wrapped in translucent wheat starch or rice flour skin. Dumplings are boat shaped and thus appear similar to Chinese gold ingot. Stuffing the dumpling is also an act associated with wealth.

Rice Rolls – This post would not be complete without mentioning rice rolls. Rice rolls are typically filled with either beef or pork, with soy sauce as a dip. Rice is a key part of Chinese culture. In fact, not so long ago dumplings were actually made from rice flour as opposed to the various ingredients used today.

Taro cake – Taro cake is a popular dim sum dish as well as a common appetizer served during Chinese New Year dinner in Cantonese region. It would be the better choice for people who like eat less oil and to be healthier.

Guest Author: Lolita Di

On the DISPATCH: Headlines  Local  Opinion

Subscribe to Weekly Newsletter

* indicates required
/ ( mm / dd ) [ALL INFO CONFIDENTIAL]

About the Author

- Outside contributors to the Dispatch are always welcome to offer their unique voices, contradictory opinions or presentation of information not included on the site.

Tags
Displaying 1 Comments
Have Your Say
  1. The Giant who Touched Day after Tomorrow-II - SmiLoans says:

    […] An introduction to traditional Dim Sum Dumplings – Dumplings are another popular dim sum dish. Served either fried or steamed, a dumpling consists of a filling that's wrapped in translucent wheat starch or rice flour skin. Dumplings are boat shaped and thus appear similar to Chinese gold … Read more on The Global Dispatch […]

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Sign up for our Weekly Newsletter



Categories

Archives

At the Movies

Pin It