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Published On: Thu, Jun 1st, 2017

Why China Needs To Do More To Pressure North Korea

As the North Korean threat increases, the time has finally come for the US to crack down on one of the “axis of evil” countries. The air attack on Syria shows how serious President Trump is, and North Korea is surely feeling the threat of air attacks.

Even President Trump has been somewhat receptive to the opinions of those on the left who recommend dialogue instead of confrontation, and has hinted at the possibility of dialogue. However, the reason the US and the rest of international society are being pressured to resist North Korea is because the “dialogue” proposed by the left and the new South Korean President Moon has never once worked. As we can see from North Korea’s threat just the other day that “hundreds of millions in the US will die,” North Korea does not intend to have dialogue.

On the other hand, pressure from China is still an important factor for continuing to avoid the use of military force. It came to light the other day that trade with China made up over 90% of North Korea’s trade total last year. This is exactly the reason why the US and international organizations emphasize the importance of China’s role in increasing the effectiveness of economic sanctions against North Korea.

Since President Trump has declared that the US itself will take action, the US soldiers stationed in Asia are probably a little relieved. If China does not do anything, it will become international society’s target for criticism. That is because doing nothing would mean China approves of North Korea’s erratic behavior.

What on earth is China thinking acting so confidently with South Korea and Japan, but doing almost nothing with North Korea?

It is about time for criticisms of South Korea and Japan, where US soldiers are stationed, to come to an end. The former “protege” South Korea is being driven into an economic corner because of the THAAD deployment issue.

In Japan, talk of the war from over 70 years ago is being stirred up again. In particular, the political use of the Nanking Massacre to stir up anti-Japanese propaganda is excessive, and it is about time for China to notice that no one in the world is listening to that propaganda. South Korea still has a long way to go to become an economic leader with a strong constitutional government, but Japan has learned from its past to become a constitutional state that is one of the best examples of capitalism and democracy.

It does not deserve to be treated as a bad guy.

Put under pressure by President Trump, China is enforcing some economic sanctions against North Korea. However, the pressure China is putting on North Korea is not at all sufficient. This is obvious when we see that North Korea has not backed down from its firm stance. It will soon become clear whether or not China is a friend of the “axis of evil”

 

Author: Lolita Di

Chinese flag, Beijing, China. 2009 Photo/Daderot

About the Author

- Outside contributors to the Dispatch are always welcome to offer their unique voices, contradictory opinions or presentation of information not included on the site.

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