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Published On: Wed, Nov 18th, 2020

What Are the Biggest Risks on a Construction Site?

Although accidents can occur at any type of workplace, some industries are more dangerous than others. Sadly, the construction industry still has a startling high number of workplace injuries and fatalities. In the U.S., it’s estimated that two construction workers die every day due to workplace injuries. 

photo/ Skeeze via pixabay

With such a high rate of fatalities, it’s important to understand why construction workers face such a high risk of harm. To date, the most common causes of construction-related fatalities are:

Falls

As construction work often involves working on unfinished buildings, falls from height aren’t uncommon. When you fall from height, your risk of serious injury or death increases significantly, although even falling from ground level can cause fatal injuries. Of course, when people fall on a construction site, the unfinished ground is an unforgiving place to land, which could contribute to the high number of workplace fatalities. 

Struck by Object

Being struck by an object is the second most common cause of construction-related fatalities, which isn’t surprising when you consider the type of objects being moved around a construction site. Industrial machinery is often used to move steel girders, bricks and concrete, so any incident which involves someone being struck can have tragic consequences. 

Electrocutions

Strict protocols, such as Lock Out, Tag Out, are designed to prevent electrical hazards on work sites, but they aren’t always effective. As a result, electrocutions continue to be one of the most common causes of construction fatalities. If someone mistakenly begins working on the electrics without realizing they’re still switched on, for example, they could suffer life-changing injuries or be killed.

Caught In-between

Being caught in-between objects, structures or equipment is another leading cause of death on construction sites. If a structure collapses, for example, it can cause catastrophic injuries and fatalities in an instant. Being crushed, caught or compressed by equipment, sadly, isn’t uncommon, even though employers are required to enforce strict protocols designed to prevent this from happening. 

Dealing with Workplace Injuries

If you’ve been injured while working on a construction site, you may be entitled to take legal action. If you’re classed as an employee, you could be eligible to receive workers’ compensation. However, if someone’s negligence has caused you harm, you may be able to make a claim against them or their employer. 

Due to the complexities involved, it can be helpful to seek advice from attorneys, like Hughes and Coleman injury lawyers Bowling Green KY. With experienced attorneys handling your case, you can be sure that you’ll get the maximum amount of compensation you’re entitled to. 

Claiming for a Wrongful Death

Similarly, if you’ve lost a loved one due to a workplace fatality on a construction site, injury lawyers may be able to help you take legal action. While obtaining compensation for a wrongful death won’t heal your grief, it can help to deal with the practical and financial difficulties you may be facing. 

Furthermore, taking legal action after a workplace accident can encourage companies to enforce stricter safety protocols. As a result, your decision to make a claim after a construction-related incident could help to make the industry safer in the future.

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