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Published On: Mon, Oct 28th, 2013

Univ Colorado at Boulder bans racist, insensitive Halloween costumes: Indian, geisha and gangsters

The University of Colorado Boulder is now taking on Halloween in the battle of political correctness as they ask students not to wear costumes which perpetuate racial, cultural and gender stereotypes.

Around campus flyers depict students from different ethnicities, cultures and religions standing next to a person dressed in costume: a young Asian woman holding a photo of a white woman dressed in a geisha costume, a young black man is standing next to another young man wearing blackface, gold chains and flashing a prop gun – all with the phrase “We’re a Culture, Not a Costume”

A university spokesman called cowboy costumes a “crude stereotype”

Students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities have also been asked to make sure their Halloween costumes are politically correct.

In a letter, officials said: “please keep in mind that certain Halloween costumes inappropriately perpetuate racial, cultural, and gender stereotypes.”

 Colorado costume ban political correctness

photos for poster

 

“As a CU Buff, making the choice to dress up as someone from another culture, either with the intention of being humorous or without the intention of being disrespectful, can lead to inaccurate and hurtful portrayals of other peoples’ cultures in the CU community,” reads a letter from CU’s dean of students, Christian Gonzales.

At CU, according to the letter, students have complained about offensive costumes in the past and even offensive costume theme parties on campus.

“For example, the CU-Boulder community has in the past witnessed and been impacted by people who dressed in costumes that included blackface or sombreros/serapes; people have also chosen costumes that portray particular cultural identities as overly sexualized, such as geishas, “squaws,” or stereotypical, such as cowboys and Indians. Additionally, some students have also hosted offensively-themed parties that reinforce negative representations of cultures as being associated with poverty (“ghetto” or “white trash/hillbilly”), or with crime or sex work.”

 

 

Halloween is also one of the more worrisome nights each year for campus administrators in terms of small crimes on campus and on University Hill.

CU police department spokesman Ryan Huff said both CUPD and Boulder Police officers will be out in force to make sure costumed party-goers are safe.

“Halloween, historically, is a time people are drinking alcohol, and if they’ve had too much they can be putting themselves in danger,” Huff said. “Drinking a lot of alcohol can lead to more serious crimes, too, such as assault.”

Huff said costumes can make it more difficult for law enforcement officers to engage with people. If a costume covers a person’s hands, Huff said, that’s a safety issue for the officers trying to engage with the person. Huff said CUPD hasn’t had any troubles with costumes in recent years.

Though he couldn’t say exactly how many officers would be out in University Hill over the holiday weekend, he said it will be a “much larger deployment than on a typical night during the week.”

 

 

About the Author

- Catherine "Kaye" Wonderhouse, a proud descendant of the Wunderhaus family is the Colorado Correspondent who will add more coverage, interviews and reports from this midwest area.

Displaying 4 Comments
Have Your Say
  1. Jan says:

    Looks like the colleges are only tolerant of liberal thing. When a conservative theme person comes onto campus there is no tolerance towards them.

  2. Toni says:

    I’m sure the Will Rogers and Pocahontas would be rolling over in their graves if they new they were being banned because wearing their type of clothing is offensive. There is going to be a revolution because the liberals cannot get away with this kind of crap much longer.

  3. […] (Source) The University of Colorado Boulder is now taking on Halloween in the battle of political correctness as they ask students not to wear costumes which perpetuate racial, cultural and gender stereotypes.Around campus flyers depict students from different ethnicities, cultures and religions standing next to a person dressed in costume: a young Asian woman holding a photo of a white woman dressed in a geisha costume, a young black man is standing next to another young man wearing blackface, gold chains and flashing a prop gun – all with the phrase “We’re a Culture, Not a Costume”A university spokesman called cowboy costumes a “crude stereotype” Students at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities have also been asked to make sure their Halloween costumes are politically correct. In a letter, officials said: “please keep in mind that certain Halloween costumes inappropriately perpetuate racial, cultural, and gender stereotypes.” “As a CU Buff, making the choice to dress up as someone from another culture, either with the intention of being humorous or without the intention of being disrespectful, can lead to inaccurate and hurtful portrayals of other peoples’ cultures in the CU community,” reads a letter from CU’s dean of students, Christian Gonzales. At CU, according to the letter, students have complained about offensive costumes in the past and even offensive costume theme parties on campus. “For example, the CU-Boulder community has in the past witnessed and been impacted by people who dressed in costumes that included blackface or sombreros/serapes; people have also chosen costumes that portray particular cultural identities as overly sexualized, such as geishas, “squaws,” or stereotypical, such as cowboys and Indians. Additionally, some students have also hosted offensively-themed parties that reinforce negative representations of cultures as being associated with poverty (“ghetto” or “white trash/hillbilly”), or with crime or sex work.” Halloween is also one of the more worrisome nights each year for campus administrators in terms of small crimes on campus and on University Hill. CU police department spokesman Ryan Huff said both CUPD and Boulder Police officers will be out in force to make sure costumed party-goers are safe. “Halloween, historically, is a time people are drinking alcohol, and if they’ve had too much they can be putting themselves in danger,” Huff said. “Drinking a lot of alcohol can lead to more serious crimes, too, such as assault.” Huff said costumes can make it more difficult for law enforcement officers to engage with people. If a costume covers a person’s hands, Huff said, that’s a safety issue for the officers trying to engage with the person. Huff said CUPD hasn’t had any troubles with costumes in recent years. Though he couldn’t say exactly how many officers would be out in University Hill over the holiday weekend, he said it will be a “much larger deployment than on a typical night during the week.” […]

  4. […] Univ Colorado at Boulder bans racist, insensitive Halloween costumes: Indian, geisha and gangsters (theglobaldispatch.com) […]

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