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Published On: Sat, Mar 4th, 2017

UAE snowballs, more data raise more questions of global warming, climate change hysteria

“Snowball fights in the UAE, snowless slopes in the Alps. Chilly winds in Dubai, balmy weather in Minnesota” — all signs of climate change.

“The recent run of chilly rain and snow in the UAE seems to affirm the UN’s admission in 2013 of a decline in temperature rises. But the complexities of time and maths make it hard for scientists to say whether that is permanent,” begins the article in The National.

“When plotted against time, the temperature measurements produce a zig-zag pattern, with some years cooler and others warmer than before. The long-term direction is clear enough, however: upwards.”

earth fireball destruction photo/ Bela Geletneky aka photoshopper24 via pixabay.com

“In 2013, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) agreed that a slowdown was under way. The data pointed to a warming rate from 1998 onwards that is barely half that of the previous half-century’s.”

A recent NOAA report was proved to be “rushed” to make the publishing date needed for a geopolitical meeting. Global cooling in the 1970s and global warming since the 1990s, one thing is certain: there is climate change.

The new report on solar activity points to solar fluctuations and the Earth’s orbit as the main contributor to these patterns.

In 2015, a team led by Thomas Karl, at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), pointed to changes in temperature measurement techniques that could have introduced subtle bias into the data. (emphasis added, The Dispatch).

The Nature Climate Change journal published work by another team that claimed the newly-corrected data were still biased and the questions just press on.
“We don’t find 50-million-year-old thermometers at the bottom of the ocean,” Matthew Huber, professor in the Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences Department at Purdue University and member of the Purdue Climate Change Research Center said. “What we do find are shells, and we use the isotopes of carbon and oxygen within the shells, complemented by temperature proxies from organic material, to say something about the carbon cycle and about the temperature in the past.”

Photo from 2012 – note Greenland is still there and the seas haven’t risen…yet
Extent of surface melt over Greenland’s ice sheet on July 8 (left) and July 12 (right). Measurements from three satellites showed that in just a few days, the melting had dramatically accelerated and an estimated 97 percent of the ice sheet surface had thawed by July 12. (Nicolo E. DiGirolamo, SSAI/NASA GSFC, and Jesse Allen, NASA Earth Observatory)

New Hampshire Coastal Risk and Hazard Commission (NHCRHC) published a report and Michael Sununu stated, “any rational assessment of the current state of sea level rise (SLR) should start with historical data. Globally the oceans have been rising at a pace of about 1.7 mm/yr and have been doing so since the end of the Little Ice Age. There have been no substantial changes in this long-term pace.”
In response to this data, New Hampshire Coastal Risk and Hazard Commission report also has a list of hundreds of recommendations, most of which either spend millions of taxpayer money, restrict any potential development in the Seacoast, or destroy local permitting and zoning by pushing rules and regulations to the state level, potentially affecting homeowners property rights statewide.
From a book by Christopher Horner: “global warming/climate change hysteria is truly the environmentalist’s dream come true. It is the perfect storm of demons and perils, and the ideal scare campaign for those who would establish global governance.”

About the Author

- Catherine "Kaye" Wonderhouse, a proud descendant of the Wunderhaus family is the Colorado Correspondent who will add more coverage, interviews and reports from this midwest area.

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