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Published On: Thu, May 8th, 2014

Two UW-Milwaukee students are the latest mumps cases, Wisconsin total now 20

Following the seven cases of the contagious viral disease, mumps, on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the case reported in a UW-La Crosse student last month, CBS 58 news is reporting today of two confirmed cases in students from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee.

According to the report, the university told students about the cases in an e-mail Wednesday, and said its health officials are working with the City of Milwaukee Health Department to see if there are more possible cases.

Mumps Photo/CDC

Mumps Photo/CDC

Wisconsin is now reporting 20 cases statewide. For more infectious disease news and information, visit and “like” the Infectious Disease News Facebook page.

In Ohio, 328 mumps cases have been linked to the Franklin, Delaware and Madison counties’ community outbreak. To date, 196 cases have been linked to The Ohio State University outbreak, according to a Columbus Public Health press release yesterday afternoon.The central Ohio mumps outbreak now has more than half as many mumps cases as there were nationwide last year.

The viral disease spreading throughout the Midwest has also affected Illinois, which is reporting 82 cases to date.

According to the Milwaukee Health Department (MHD), Mumps disease is caused by the mumps virus. The virus can be spread from person to person through saliva, such as when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Mumps can also be spread by sharing food or drink with an infected person.

Signs of mumps may include fever, headache, and loss of appetite. One or more salivary glands (located in the cheeks, below and in front of the ears) may become swollen and tender. The right and left glands might not swell at the same time. The swelling may progressively get worse and more painful. Swallowing, talking, chewing, or drinking acidic beverages (such as orange juice) may make the pain worse.

Other symptoms may include headache, vomiting, upset stomach, tiredness, and a stiff neck. Mumps can cause viral meningitis, which can be fatal, especially among infants and the elderly. Sometimes when boys or men get mumps, one or both of their testicles will become swollen and inflamed which can occasionally cause them to become sterile.

A case of mumps will usually last for 2-3 weeks. Sometimes, a person can be infected with mumps without feeling sick at all. Even though an infected person does not feel ill, they can still pass mumps to other people.

There is a safe and effective vaccine (MMR) that prevents mumps. The MMR vaccination is required for school/childcare attendance. Children should receive two doses of MMR (at 12-15 months and 4-6 years). Unvaccinated adults should also receive two doses of MMR.

 

 

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About the Author

- Writer, Co-Founder and Executive Editor of The Global Dispatch. Robert has been covering news in the areas of health, world news and politics for a variety of online news sources. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the website, Outbreak News Today and hosts the podcast, Outbreak News Interviews on iTunes, Stitcher and Spotify Robert is politically Independent and a born again Christian Follow @bactiman63

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  1. Milwaukee health officials confirm four mumps cases | Outbreak News Today says:

    […] a follow up to a report yesterday, The City of Milwaukee Health Department (MHD) has received reports of four confirmed cases of […]

  2. Milwaukee health officials confirm four mumps cases - The Global Dispatch says:

    […] a follow up to a report yesterday, The City of Milwaukee Health Department (MHD) has received reports of four confirmed cases of […]

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