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Published On: Wed, Jun 15th, 2016

Top Countries Most Affected by Drug Abuse – How Can the Best Drug Rehab Centers Help?

Drug addiction is a global problem that is affecting countries around the world in different ways. In some countries the drug of choice is heroin, while in others it is cocaine or alcohol. Regardless of the source of the addiction, the effect on society is always similar, with addicts contributing little to the economy and allowing the black market to thrive through illicit drug sales. Still, it is apparent that some countries have become better at controlling the addiction crises than others. We recently had a chat with Per Wickstrom, founder and CEO of Best Drug Rehab in Manistee, Michigan, to discuss which countries have the worst drug problems and how rehab facilities can help:

Public domain photo/Psychonaught

Public domain photo/Psychonaught

1. Iran’s Heroin Problem

Heroin is and always has been a massive problem in Iran, with more than 14% of the population per capita being addicted to the drug. While efforts to secure Iran’s border have greatly cut down on trafficking and exports, the country’s native production of heroin is still enough to keep their addiction problem growing. It is no surprise that heroin is the drug of choice for the most addicted country in the world; at Best Drug Rehab we’ve seen heroin wreak havoc on quite a few people in our community over the years.

2. France’s Prescription Pill Problem

Prescription medication is widely available for cheap prices in France, resulting in more than 13% of the population being addicted. A pill that costs $20 in America would only cost about $5 in France. Most of the prescription drug problem in France involves substances that contain methadone, benzodiazepines, and buprenorphine.

3. Slovakia’s Inhalant Problem

Slovakia has the highest use of illicit inhalant use in the world, with more than 13% of the population having used the drugs. Although it is not entirely clear why this country has such a high rate of inhalant use, it has been theorized that the nation’s easy access to tuluene (a clear substance similar to paint thinner) is what is fueling the widespread addiction epidemic. This is a particularity dangerous substance because there have been a number of reported deaths of first time users.

4. Russia’s Alcohol Problem

Russians have long been known for having drinking problems. Most of the men who don’t make it past age 55 usually pass away due to alcohol-related illnesses. Drinking has been a part of the Russian culture for a long time, so the nation would have to see a strong societal change for the rate of addiction to be curbed. Furthermore, with much of the country being rural, there aren’t many alcohol addiction treatment centers to turn to.

5. Afghanistan’s Heroin Problem

While Afghanistan’s heroin problem is only about half as bad as Iran’s, with nearly 7% of the population per capita addicted, it is still a growing concern for the war-torn country. It is somewhat surprising that the rate of addiction isn’t even higher, considering the fact that Afghanistan is the world’s largest producer of opium.

Communities Need Treatment Facilities

In closing, Per noted that the bottom line is that the countries on this list do not have enough treatment facilities or anti-addiction advertisement campaigns to slow down the rate of new addictions or even address existing addictions. More facilities and more awareness are the first two things needed to start implementing a solution.

Guest Author: Lolita Di

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