Quantcast
Published On: Tue, Jun 24th, 2014

‘The Song’ is set to break faith based film stereotypes with Solomon story

The-Song-ali faulkner photo2014 has proved to be the year of the faith based film with Son of God, God’s Not Dead, Heaven Is For Real and Mom’s Night Out proving small budgets geared towards a Christian audience can reach an audience. Next up will be The Song, a music-themed love story deeply rooted in the life of Solomon from scripture.

The Song ventures into powerful and challenging territory dealing with temptations of sex, fame, alcohol, greed and abuse. Starring Alan Powell from Anthem Lights and Ali Faulkner of Twilight fame, The Song gets brutally honest with Christians about the challenges of a dark world pushing humans towards pleasure and away from commitment and a higher power.

This is all part of the plan says producer Tony Young. “Our film is a redemptive tale inspired by the life and writings of Solomon, on his quest for fame, fortune, love, acceptance and ultimate satisfaction and certainly our film is made by people of faith, but I think the term ‘faith-based’ film means different things to different people,” explained Young to the Christian Post.

“I believe when most people hear that term today, they think of films that are more ‘conversional’ in nature as opposed to ‘conversational,’ which is what we are trying to create in our films.”

Alan Powell as Jed The Song king on throne photoConversational is exactly what screenings are causing. Teens are left with questions for their parents, dads leave talking with their son about the difficulties of staying faithful to a loving wife and what temptation is really like in the world. The Song challenges Christians by bursting their proverbial bubble of perfection.

While it was just a screening, Powell and Faulkner were awesome in their, immediately connecting to the audience who was cheering for their relationship. Powell delivers powerful and moving contemporary Christian music effortlessly and easily sells the rock star theme which is forced in many mainstream films. Nashville‘s Caitlin Nicol-Thomas steals scene after scene, even when the audience turns against her.

Director Richard Ramsey didn’t make a Christian film pretending to be a big budget film, competing with Hollywood. Nor is it a low budget Christan film with a good story – this is a just a good movie through and through. It doesn’t beat the audience over the head with a Bible, so secular audiences will enjoy the love story as well.

More details are certain to follow so check back. In the meantime, enjoy the trailer below.

The Song is set to arrive in theaters September 26, 2014.

More info at TheSongmovie.com and at  www.TheSongResources.com

The Song photo Caitlin Nicol Thomas Alan Powell singing

The Song movie poster

About the Author

- Writer and Co-Founder of The Global Dispatch, Brandon has been covering news, offering commentary for years, beginning professional in 2008 on sites like Examiner and blogs: Desk of Brian, Crazed Fanboy. Appearing on several radio shows, Brandon has hosted Dispatch Radio, written his first novel (The Rise of the Templar) will be a licensed Assembly of God Pastor by the Spring of 2017. "Why do we do this?" I was asked and the answer is simple. "I just want the truth. I want a source of information that tells me what's going and clearly attempts to separate opinion from fact. Set aside left and right, old and young, just point to the world and say, 'Look!'" To Contact Brandon email [email protected] ATTN: BRANDON

Displaying 6 Comments
Have Your Say
  1. […] to arms” rather than a film which instigates conviction (like in last year’s The Song). Legalization of gay marriage and widespread acceptance of same-sex relationships across America […]

  2. Angie Carter says:

    That’s just it, the Bible was never meant to beat people over the head…people used it to beat people over the head.
    That is another message in this movie, His Love is about to conquer all!

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>



At the Movies