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Published On: Thu, Aug 3rd, 2017

Texas: Immigration, sanctuary bill called ‘racial profiling law’

According to an analysis released Tuesday by the Texas Together Campaign, a coalition of community and business leaders across the state, Texas’ “racial profiling law,” SB 4, will shrink the Texas economy between $9.2 billion and $13.8 billion. The Texas Together group is leading the opposition voice to the crackdown legislation on illegal immigrants arrested for other crimes and the rules surrounding sanctuary cities.

“SB4 is not only a discriminatory law that will profile people of color, but it is also bad for business, as it will drive Texans away, creating job losses and decreased revenue,” said Adriana Cadena, coordinator of Texas Together.

The study was produced by the RITA Coalition based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

“This economic miracle, job creation…is in danger of being brought to its knees by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick,” said Ramiro A. Cavazos, President & CEO of the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at the Tuesday rally. “These are dishonorable people who are representing us in Austin and Washington.”

The Texas Tribune summarized key elements of the bill back in June: “The measure, which takes effect Sept. 1, will allow local law enforcement to question legally detained or arrested people about their immigration status and punish officials who don’t cooperate with federal immigration authorities, subjecting sheriffs, constables, police chiefs and other local leaders to Class A misdemeanor charges. SB 4, which also applies to public colleges, mandates civil penalties for groups that violate the provision, beginning at $1,000 for a first offense and rising as high as $25,500 for each infraction that follows.” (Emphasis added, the Dispatch)

In response to the heightened awareness of the immigration concerns during the President Trump campaign, the issue still polarizes voters.

“It’s not honorable. It’s racist,” Herrera said.

Navarro called on San Antonio’s largest businesses, including HEB, Valero and USAA , to break their silence and call on state leaders to repeal SB 4.

“We’re brown, we may look different, but we’re still Americans,” Navarro added.

Abbott made SB 4 one of his emergency items during the regular legislative session, and defended the legality of the measure upon signing it, saying certain provisions of SB 4 have “already been tested at the United States Supreme Court and approved there.”

He also said the law was especially needed after Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez announced in January her department’s intentions to reduce cooperation with federal immigration enforcement.

EDITORIAL NOTE: I highlighted the key text in bold because it appears to be the critical language for supporters and opponents of the bill/law. Many supporters of a crackdown on immigration view it ONLY through the lens of “illegal” those citizens also committing crimes. -KW

New TIME Magazine covers features Illegal Immigration Photo/TIME

About the Author

- Catherine "Kaye" Wonderhouse, a proud descendant of the Wunderhaus family is the Colorado Correspondent who will add more coverage, interviews and reports from this midwest area.

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