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Published On: Sat, Aug 5th, 2017

SDCC: ‘Captain Marvel’ set in 1990s, Samuel L Jackson to appear, concept art released

Marvel Studios’ presentation of the “#Captain Marvel” concept art at the San Diego Comic-Con ignited fan interest in Brie Larson’s led Captain Marvel film.

Kevin Feige confirmed an appearance by Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury and that the film is set on the early 1990s. Below is great commentary on the setting of the film from The Verge.

Jerad S. Marantz published the Kree art on the Internet, noting much to his surprise, it was shown during Marvel Studios’ Hall H presentation.

From jsmarantz: Honored to find out this morning that my #skrull designs were shown by the #mcuat #comiccon2017 At first I was afraid that the artwork got leaked and I was a bit panicked, but fortunately it was done on purpose 🙂 I did these designs while working in house at #marvel on #captainmarvel for the very talented @andyparkartYou should all check out his Captain Marvel design. It was also released and is amazing! #marvelcinematicuniverse #marvelmovies #marvel #skrulls #superskrulls#aliens #badguys

While she may be compared to Wonder Woman, Carol Danvers gets her powers when a Kree device exploded near her and becomes one of the mightiest Avengers.

In the comic book, the character was initially known Ms. Marvel, from writers Chris Claremont and Gerry Conway, gaining popularity in a self-titled series in January 1977.
Directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck from a script by Nicole Perlman and Meg LeFauve.
Captain Marvel arrives March 8, 2019.

The Verge: It cannot be arbitrary that the film is essentially a prequel to the entire MCU. Storywise, anytime Marvel films spend time in the past, it’s done for either character development or world-building. Captain America: The First Avenger is rooted firmly in the 1940s. ABC’s Agent Carter series exists to deepen the importance of S.H.I.E.L.D during the Cold War. Hell, even both Guardians of the Galaxy films — while taking place in the modern era — draw from the ‘70s and ’80s to very specifically serve their stories as well as their aesthetics.

The ‘90s, however, is a cultural period we haven’t seen much of in the films. Most of the characters we know were either too young, inactive, or simply not on Earth. The move will give Marvel a fresh time period to play with, which is especially enticing at a time when ‘90s nostalgia is strong amongst its millennial fans. As Marvel continues to experiment with its moviemaking formula, that pull will help set Captain Marvel apart from every movie that came before it.

About the Author

- Writer and Co-Founder of The Global Dispatch, Brandon has been covering news, offering commentary for years, beginning professional in 2008 on sites like Examiner and blogs: Desk of Brian, Crazed Fanboy. Appearing on several radio shows, Brandon has hosted Dispatch Radio, written his first novel (The Rise of the Templar) will be a licensed Assembly of God Pastor by the Spring of 2017. "Why do we do this?" I was asked and the answer is simple. "I just want the truth. I want a source of information that tells me what's going and clearly attempts to separate opinion from fact. Set aside left and right, old and young, just point to the world and say, 'Look!'" To Contact Brandon email [email protected] ATTN: BRANDON

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  1. […] Below is great commentary on the setting of the film from The Verge. Jerad S. Marantz published the Kree art on the Internet, noting much to his surprise, it was shown during Marvel Studios’ Hall H presentation. While she may be compared to Wonder Woman … ( read original story …) […]

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