Quantcast
Published On: Thu, Sep 13th, 2018

NASA issues infrared look at Hurricane Florence

All eyes were on Hurricane Florence Wednesday as the Category 3 storm barreled toward the U.S. East Coast. NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument was watching, too, and captured new imagery of the storm’s approach.

AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), senses emitted infrared and microwave radiation from Earth to provide a three-dimensional look at weather and climate. It acquired infrared and visible light images at 1:30 p.m. EDT Wednesday. In the infrared image, a symmetrical ring of deep, cold rain clouds is shown in purple. Warmer areas, including a well-defined eye, are shown in blue. Shallower rain clouds are shown in green, while the red areas represent mostly cloud-free air moving away from the storm. The visible light image shows Florence much as our eyes would see it. It showcases the storm’s thick cloud shield with clouds that extend far from the eye of the storm.

Photo Courtesy of Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Hurricane Florence underwent rapid intensification from a Category 2 storm to a Category 4 storm earlier this week. Although it was downgraded to Category 3 on Wednesday, the storm remains large and powerful with the potential for devastating winds, rain and storm surges. States of emergency have already been declared in several states along the coast.

Launched into orbit in 2002, the AIRS and AMSU instruments fly onboard NASA’s Aqua spacecraft and are managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the Caltech in Pasadena.

About the Author

- The generic Dispatch designation, used primarily for press releases or syndicated content, but may be used for guest author requesting a generic nomenclature

Tags
Displaying 5 Comments
Have Your Say
  1. […] NASA issues infrared look at Hurricane Florence  The Global Dispatch […]

  2. […] All eyes had been on Storm Florence Wednesday because the Category Three storm barreled toward the U.S. East Hotfoot. NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument become once looking out at, too, and captured original imagery of the storm’s approach. AIRS, along with the Evolved Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), senses emitted infrared and microwave radiation from Earth to present a three-d take a examine climate and native climate. It got infrared and considered light photos at 1:30 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Within the infrared portray, a symmetrical ring of deep, frigid rain clouds is shown in crimson. Hotter areas, in conjunction with a smartly-defined maintain, are shown in blue. Shallower rain clouds are shown in inexperienced, whereas the crimson areas portray mostly cloud-free air involving away from the storm. The considered light portray exhibits Florence a lot as our eyes would behold it. It showcases the storm’s thick cloud defend with clouds that lengthen far from the maintain of the storm. Photo Courtesy of Jet Propulsion Laboratory Storm Florence underwent rapid intensification from a Category 2 storm to a Category Four storm earlier this week. Even even supposing it become once downgraded to Category Three on Wednesday, the storm remains tidy and extremely good with the functionality for devastating winds, rain and storm surges. States of emergency salvage already been declared in different states along the walk. Launched into orbit in 2002, the AIRS and AMSU devices walk onboard NASA’s Aqua spacecraft and are managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, below contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the Caltech in Pasadena. Read More […]

  3. […] (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Source link […]

  4. […] NASA issues infrared look at Hurricane Florence  The Global Dispatch […]

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>



Recent Posts

Categories

Archives

At the Movies