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Published On: Thu, Oct 12th, 2017

Miroslav Djordjevic speaks out on rise of regret of gender reassignment surgeries in transgender community

A world-leading genital reconstruction surgeon is alarmed by the increase in his patients seeking reversals of so-called “gender reassignment surgery.”
According to a report in The Telegraph, Professor Miroslav Djordjevic has seen a high number of “transgender” people who have undergone sex-change surgeries later express regrets and experience crippling depression and suicidal thoughts. Djordjevic cites two reasons: a lack of robust research on the topic and a lack of psychiatric evaluation and counseling before the surgeries. While Djordjevic requires his patients to undergo a year or more of psychiatric evaluation followed by hormone evaluation and therapy, some patients seeking reversals have told him that they were only asked if they had the money for the surgery beforehand.

photo courtesy of LC.org

Djordjevic said the average age of his patients has dropped from 45 to 21 since he first started more than 20 years ago, with some in the medical community advocating for allowing minors to get sex-change surgeries. Djordjevic believes that to be dangerous ground and said he personally will not do those surgeries.
“I’m afraid of what will happen five to ten years later with this person,” Djordjevic said of patients younger than 18 who may eventually have the surgery.
James Caspian, a psychotherapist at Bath Spa University in Southwest England, tried to do research on so-called “detransitioning,” but his proposal was rejected after his preliminary findings revealed that an increase of young people, particularly women, were regretting “gender reassignment surgery,” according to The Guardian.
Liberty Counsel has been instrumental in defeating proposed laws in numerous states which sought to prohibit counselors – including pastors, teachers, and parents – from providing counsel to any minor (including a parent’s own child) about the child’s unwanted same-sex attractions or gender confusion.
Walt Heyer struggled with gender dysphoria as a result of being sexually abused as a boy by a family member, combined with his grandmother’s decision to secretly clothe him as a girl. Heyer had “gender reassignment surgery.” However, after he experienced restoration and healing from a relationship with Jesus Christ, Heyer reverted back to his biological gender as a man.
“I see the tragic consequences of polices to expand gender/sex beyond male and female, in the desperate letters I receive from those who regret gender transitioning and from the families of those who are still caught in the transgender delusion,” said Heyer.
“To suggest that people can change their sex like they change clothes or dye their hair is dangerous,” said Mat Staver, Founder and Chairman of Liberty Counsel. “People’s discontentment with their birth sex cannot be solved by hormones and body mutilation,” said Staver.

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  1. According to a report in The Telegraph, Professor Miroslav Djordjevic has seen a high number of “transgender” people who have undergone sex-change surgeries later express regrets and experience crippling depression and suicidal thoughts.

    That is quite the statement. Let’s do a little fact checking.

    How many people, exactly, is he talking about?

    A maximum of 15 people he claims to have talked with. Over 5 years. I note that apparently several of those weren’t even originally his patients – so this number is inflated by his aggregating other doctor’s patients.

    Out of how many?

    Djordjevic’s clinic, alone, has performed several hundred gender confirmation surgeries in the same time period.

    Meaning?

    That is a maximum regret rate of around 2%. Exactly in line with the well known statistics for the last 50 years as documented in long term studies.

    Dhejne, Cecilia & Oberg, K & Arver, Stefan & Landen, M. (2014).
    INCREASING INCIDENCE OF SEX REASSIGNMENT APPLICATIONS BUT FEW REGRETS: A COMPLETE ANALYSIS OF ALL APPLICATIONS DURING 50 YEARS.
    Journal of Sexual Medicine. 11. 8-9.

    Abstract

    Incidence and prevalence of applications in Sweden for legal and surgical sex reassignment were examined over a 50-year period (1960–2010), including the legal and surgical reversal applications. A total of 767 people (289 natal females and 478 natal males) applied for legal and surgical sex reassignment. Out of these, 89 % (252 female-to-males [FM] and 429 male-to-females [MF]) received a new legal gender and underwent sex reassignment surgery (SRS). A total of 25 individuals (7 natal females and 18 natal males), equaling 3.3 %, were denied a new legal gender and SRS. The remaining withdrew their application, were on a waiting list for surgery, or were granted partial treatment. The incidence of applications was calculated and stratified over four periods between 1972 and 2010. The incidence increased significantly from 0.16 to 0.42/100,000/year (FM) and from 0.23 to 0.73/100,000/year (MF). The most pronounced increase occurred after 2000. The proportion of FM individuals 30 years or older at the time of application remained stable around 30 %. In contrast, the proportion of MF individuals 30 years or older increased from 37 % in the first decade to 60 % in the latter three decades. The point prevalence at December 2010 for individuals who applied for a new legal gender was for FM 1:13,120 and for MF 1:7,750. The FM:MF sex ratio fluctuated but was 1:1.66 for the whole study period. There were 15 (5 MF and 10 MF) regret applications corresponding to a 2.2 % regret rate for both sexes. There was a significant decline of regrets over the time period.

    IOW, this entire article is built around a lie: That there is an increasing rate of regrets. The reality, as documented by actual peer reviewed studies, as opposed to individual anecdotes, is the exact opposite: There are more people receiving this very necessary surgery – with smaller percentage of them regretting it.

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