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Michigan salmonella outbreak hits 29 cases, possibly linked to two Roosevelt Park establishments

In a follow-up on the salmonella outbreak in Muskegon County, Michigan, health officials say that the investigation that is winding down possibly links it to two Roosevelt Park establishments.

Image/CDC

Image/CDC

Public Health Muskegon County says that those sickened had in common a history of consuming meals between Oct. 30 and Nov. 2, 2013, containing chicken and/or lettuce at Pints and Quarts Pub and Grill or C.F. Prime Chophouse & Wine Bar, which share the same kitchen.

“We conducted over 100 interviews with food service workers, restaurant patrons, and others,” explained Ken Kraus, Director of Public Health Muskegon County. “We spoke with those who were ill as well as those who did not get sick to gather as much information as possible about what may have happened during this 4-day period.”

“The restaurant owners and staff have cooperated fully with the investigation and shown the utmost concern for the problem,” said Kraus. “We’ve repeatedly observed and interviewed the restaurant staff and at this time have been unable to find a procedure or practice that would lead to the contamination that occurred. It is clear however, that those sickened were exposed to the bacteria during a limited time period at those locations. There is no indication that this is an ongoing public health concern, but rather appears to be an isolated incident.”

The outbreak has officially sickened 29 people total, with Muskegon County accounting for 25 of the cases and Ottawa County reporting four.

Laboratory testing revealed that most cases were caused by Salmonella Enteritidis, a common type of Salmonella associated most often with eggs and poultry.

Salmonella is typically a food-borne illness acquired from contaminated raw poultry, eggs, and unpasteurized milk and cheese products. Thorough cooking kills Salmonella. Food may also become contaminated by the hands of an infected food handler who did not wash hands with soap after using the bathroom.

Salmonella may also be found in the feces of some pets, especially those with diarrhea, and people can become infected if they do not wash their hands after contact with pets or pet feces. Reptiles, such as turtles, lizards, and snakes, are particularly likely to harbor Salmonella.

Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hoursafter infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some persons, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.

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About the Author

- Writer, Co-Founder and Executive Editor of The Global Dispatch. Robert has been covering news in the areas of health, world news and politics for a variety of online news sources. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the website, Outbreak News Today and hosts the podcast, Outbreak News Interviews on iTunes, Stitcher and Spotify Robert is politically Independent and a born again Christian Follow @bactiman63

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