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Published On: Tue, Jun 12th, 2012

Jerry Sandusky to face accuser in court today

The alleged victim whose allegations triggered the criminal investigation into Jerry Sandusky is expected to take the stand Tuesday in the former Penn State assistant football coach’s child rape trial, kicking off the second day of testimony in the high-profile case.

Michael Boni, a lawyer for the person identified in court documents as Victim 1, told CNN on Monday night his client is “ready to go.”

CNN details the allegations from Victim 1:

The grand jury report cited evidence that Sandusky, who met the boy when he was 11 or 12 years old, “indecently fondled Victim 1 on a number of occasions, performed oral sex on Victim 1 on a number of occasions and had Victim 1 perform oral sex on him on at least one occasion.”

The teenager, who transferred schools amid the fallout from the Sandusky investigation, graduated from his new high school this past weekend, according to Boni. He is contemplating scholarship offers from colleges, the lawyer adds.

Despite what he described as systemic sexual abuse by Sandusky, the witness said he was “scared” and reluctant to talk about it and “lose the good things I had.” But he said he decided to tell his story after hearing that “this happened over and over and over again.”

Meanwhile,  the defense attorneys say they intend to offer expert testimony from a psychologist who “will explain that the words, tones, requests and statements made in the letters are consistent with a person who suffers from a Histrionic Personality Disorder,” according to documents.

Histrionic personality disorder is part of a class of conditions called dramatic personality disorders, which are marked by unstable emotions and distorted self-images, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

For these people, self-esteem doesn’t come from true feelings of self worth, but rather from the approval from other people, and those suffering from this disorder will often engage in dramatic or inappropriate behaviors to call attention to themselves.

“People develop this disorder because they have a need to be appreciated and to feel valued and worthwhile and special,” said Nadine Kaslow, psychologist at Emory University School of Medicine, who has not treated Sandusky.

 

 

 

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About the Author

- Writer and Co-Founder of The Global Dispatch, Brandon has been covering news, offering commentary for years, beginning professionally in 2003 on Crazed Fanboy before expanding into other blogs and sites. Appearing on several radio shows, Brandon has hosted Dispatch Radio, written his first novel (The Rise of the Templar) and completed the three years Global University program in Ministerial Studies to be a pastor. To Contact Brandon email [email protected] ATTN: BRANDON

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