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Published On: Sat, Sep 2nd, 2017

Dinesh D’Souza links Margaret Sanger to KKK, Nazi beliefs, genocide, Planned Parenthood

Margaret Sanger is the heralded co-founder of Planned Parenthood and author Dinesh D’Souza takes aim at the leftist icon, beginning in his new op-ed: “Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, has an ignoble legacy as a racist who addressed the Ku Klux Klan and initiated a Negro Project to reduce the population of poor, uneducated African Americans whom she considered unfit to reproduce themselves. This Margaret Sanger—the real Margaret Sanger—is completely whitewashed in Parenthood propaganda, which deceitfully portrays Sanger as a champion of reproductive ‘choice.'”

Depiction of Sanger’s “quality not quantity” message 1918 images

The conservative writer is certain to ruffle feathers, detailing the shocking links between Sanger and the racism of the past: “Sanger was part of a community of American progressives who championed two remedies to get rid of “unfit” populations. The first was forced sterilization, which was Sanger’s preferred solution.”

Some decry the addition of Sanger to the Smithsonian, but with the recall of statues from the Civil War and the end of Columbus Day in Los Angeles, maybe it’s time to hide the legacy of Sanger as well.

Still others cling to the politicized and left-wing propaganda perpetuated on their sites: “Try Politifact, maybe Snopes. They tell a far different tale,” one writes in a Letter to the Editor at the Register Guard.

Snopes confesses that Sanger spoke to the KKK in New Jersey and attempts to link the eugenics pioneer to Martin Luther King Jr. but omits the shocking details presented by D’Souza (which are all footnoted): “Edwin Black documents in his book The War Against the Weak, the Nazi sterilization law of 1933 and the subsequent Nazi euthanasia laws were both based on blueprints drawn up by Sanger, Popenoe and other American progressives” and “Sanger’s close associates Clarence Gamble, who funded Sanger and spoke at her conferences, and Lothrop Stoddard, who published in Sanger’s magazine and served on the board of her American Birth Control League, both knew about the Nazi sterilization and euthanasia programs and praised them. Stoddard traveled to Germany where he met with top Nazi officials and even secured an audience with Hitler. His 1940 book Into the Darkness is a paean to Hitler and Nazi eugenics.”

Snopes has defended the left-wing Southern Poverty Law Center and their shameful “Hate Map” while The Federalist pulled back the disguise and revealed the Politifact bias against conservatives – full analysis HERE

Margaret Sanger cartoon — An illustration from Birth Control Review, 1918

 

About the Author

- Roxanne "Butter" Bracco began with the Dispatch as Pittsburgh Correspondent, but will be providing reports and insights from Washington DC, Maryland and the surrounding region. Contact Roxie aka "Butter" at [email protected] ATTN: Roxie or Butter Bracco

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