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Published On: Sat, Mar 16th, 2019

Comic book artist Ethan Van Sciver: ‘Captain Marvel’ is a disgrace, built to ‘virtue signal’

Former DC Comics artist Ethan Van Sciver attacked the latest Marvel film, Captain Marvel, as a “disgrace.”

“Day two of the Captain Marvel review embargo having been lifted. Listen. The internet is awash with unwashed weirdos freaking out being very, very unhappy about the fact that this movie, of course, of course, isn’t a very good movie,” Van Sciver says in his video rant.

“It’s not possible to make a good Captain Marvel movie. It just really isn’t possible. It isn’t possible to make an excellent Captain Marvel movie, one that can actually fulfill the hopes and dreams of women everywhere. Why? Because Captain Marvel isn’t just that good of a character. Captain Marvel is a character built on convenience, built on the desire of Marvel Comics to virtue signal that they, too, have their own Wonder Woman. Their own standalone powerful female character that is not connected to any teams like the Fantastic Four, X-Men or Avengers, or anything like that — somebody who has been beloved for decades and decades. They don’t have anything like that.”

This may be shocking for some, but he then chronicles the comic book history to make his case, which has little to due with the film, and more to do with the social justice moment.

“So they reached into obscurity and plucked out Carol Danvers, the second Captain Marvel,” Van Sciver explains. “There was also Captain Mar-vell who was a man, and Carol Danvers was an incidental character who within his story arc, she gained the powers, she’s Captain Marvel. Ultimately, the biggest thing people remember about Captain Marvel is that she was kind of a pushover and Rogue, from the X-Men, stole her powers and became totally awesome for a long time. Rogue touched her, absorbed her powers and then could fly and do all the things Captain Marvel could do and retain some of her memories, and that was pretty interesting. Other than that, Captain Marvel is a big zero. And yet there she was. Ultimately, she had the last name Marvel. She was her own character. She wasn’t like She-Hulk or Spider-Woman, one of these female characters that was just created to protect the trademark of their male established characters, like Spider-Man and the Hulk. Could she be Marvel’s great white female hope? Uh. No. Definitely not.”

Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige stated that Captain Marvel is one of the most popular and powerful characters in comics, Van Sciver presses into this “lie.”

“Of course. Of course. Marvel is out there pretending right now that everybody has always loved Captain Marvel, that she’s popular. This character has canceled nine comic book series that have been launched in her honor. She can’t maintain an audience,” Van Sciver offers. “People just don’t like this character very much. She’s okay. She is a guest star. She can guest star in someone else’s book, but actually maintaining her own comic book is tough when you have no personality and you are an SJW character.”

Van Sciver has worked in comic books for 26 years, reaching a popular status wth his art for Geoff Johns’ Green Lantern.

Danvers isn’t really that relatable of a character compared to other Marvel characters.

“In the meantime, you look at every other character in The Avengers and you have complicated, complex, three-dimensional characters that people can relate to,” Van Sciver says. “Everybody can relate to Tony Stark. He has everything he wants, but he has a drinking problem. That is his demon that he has to fight in order to be a superhero. He is a little bit arrogant and all of that stuff. People like that. People like to relate to that. Peter Parker has these powers, these very, very strange powers, but he is also broke and down on his luck all the time. He’s shouldering the care for his old Aunt May. All of these things, these are complicated characters that people love because of their flaws. Why SJW’s don’t understand that is behind me.”

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