Quantcast
Published On: Tue, Nov 19th, 2013

CDC advises travelers and Americans living in China on how to protect themselves from H7N9 avian influenza

With the total number of cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus up to 139, with 45 deaths in China, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a travel notice Friday for travelers and Americans living in China and preventive measures they can take against the strain of bird flu.

Image/CIA

Image/CIA

The federal health agency notes that cases of the virus have been reported from the following Chinese provinces: Anhui, Beijing, Fujian, Guangdong, Hebei, Henan, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Shandong, Shanghai, and Zhejiang.

In addition, a case was reported in Taiwan in a person who traveled to China.

The CDC says, “Available evidence suggests that most people have been infected with the virus after having contact with infected poultry or contaminated environments.”

Because of this, they offer the following preventive measures one can take if traveling to, or living in China:

There is currently no vaccine to prevent H7N9. CDC is repeating its standard advice to travelers and Americans living in China to follow good hand hygiene and food safety practices and to avoid contact with animals.

  • Do not touch birds, pigs, or other animals.
    • Do not touch animals whether they are alive or dead.
    • Avoid live bird or poultry markets.
    • Avoid other markets or farms with animals (wet markets).
  • Eat food that is fully cooked.
    • Eat meat and poultry that is fully cooked (not pink) and served hot.
    • Eat hard-cooked eggs (not runny).
    • Don’t eat or drink dishes that include blood from any animal.
    • Don’t eat food from street vendors.
  • Practice hygiene and cleanliness:
    • Wash your hands often.
    • If soap and water aren’t available, clean your hands with hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
    • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
    • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
    • Try to avoid close contact, such as kissing, hugging, or sharing eating utensils or cups, with people who are sick.
  • See a doctor if you become sick during or after travel to China.
    • See a doctor right away if you become sick with fever, coughing, or shortness of breath.
    • If you get sick while you are still in China, visit the US Department of State website to find a list of local doctors and hospitals. Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website (www.jointcommissioninternational.org).
    • According to a message issued by the US Embassy in Beijing, patients with fever and other symptoms of flu will be sent to designated hospitals for evaluation.
    • Delay your travel home until after you have recovered or your doctor says it is okay to travel.
    • If you get sick with fever, coughing, or shortness of breath after you return to the United States, be sure to tell your doctor about your recent travel to China.

For more infectious disease news and information, visit and “like” the Infectious Disease News Facebook page

Looking for a job in health care? Check here to see what’s available

 

About the Author

- Writer, Co-Founder and Executive Editor of The Global Dispatch. Robert has been covering news in the areas of health, world news and politics for a variety of online news sources. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the website, Outbreak News Today and hosts the podcast, Outbreak News Interviews on iTunes, Stitcher and Spotify Robert is politically Independent and a born again Christian Follow @bactiman63

Tags

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>



Categories

Archives

At the Movies