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Published On: Fri, Feb 1st, 2013

Canadian Liver Foundation cartoon advises baby-boomers to get tested for hepatitis C

Based on research that shows that baby boomers born between 1945 and 1965 are up to five times more likely to be infected with hepatitis C than any other age group, the Canadian Liver Foundation (CLF) released an informational cartoon video targeting this age group earler this week.

Image/CLF Video Screen Shot

Image/CLF Video Screen Shot

The CLF even went farther than the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation saying that  those born between 1945 and 1975 should get tested, taking into account immigration from countries where hepatitis C is more common.

In Canada alone, an estimated 300,000 Canadians are currently infected with hepatitis C virus, with up to 5,000 new infections occurring annually. Many aren’t aware that they have it.

All it takes is a simple blood test to determine if someone has hepatitis C.

“We know that risk-based testing has not been effective in identifying all infected adults, and most physicians surveyed agree they do not screen enough patients for hepatitis C,” said Dr. Morris Sherman, Chairman of the CLF and hepatologist at Toronto General Hospital. “Given that today’s treatments can cure a majority of those infected, it’s time to be proactive at identifying chronic hepatitis C in the age group with the highest prevalence. The hepatitis C antibody test is inexpensive and is covered by all provincial health care plans.”

Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with hepatitis C virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with hepatitis C virus enters the body of someone who is not infected.

Hepatitis C can be either “acute” or “chronic”. Acute hepatitis C virus infection is a short-term illness that occurs within the 1st 6 months after someone is exposed to hepatitis C virus. For most people, acute infection leads to chronic infection. Chronic hepatitis C is a serious disease than can result in long-term health problems, or even death. There is no vaccine for hepatitis C.

The CLF prefaces their video with the following, attempting to target baby-boomers:

Yep, all those free-loving, groovy adventures from the past — even stuff you only tried once — could have left you with more than you anticipated. Symptoms of hepatitis C can take decades to cause enough liver damage for you to feel sick.

The virus is spread through blood-to-blood contact, so that psychedelic tattoo or piercing you got years ago could have infected you with the virus. Think you’re not at-risk? Think again! You could have become infected if you received a blood transfusion before 1990 or even by having shared personal hygiene items like razors or nail clippers.

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About the Author

- Writer, Co-Founder and Executive Editor of The Global Dispatch. Robert has been covering news in the areas of health, world news and politics for a variety of online news sources. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the website, Outbreak News Today and hosts the podcast, Outbreak News Interviews on iTunes, Stitcher and Spotify Robert is politically Independent and a born again Christian Follow @bactiman63

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  1. Canadian Liver Foundation cartoon advises baby-boomers to get tested for … – The Global Dispatch | Cure Liver Diseases says:

    […] Canadian Liver Foundation cartoon advises baby-boomers to get tested for …The Global DispatchBased on research that shows that baby boomers born between 1945 and 1965 are up to five times more likely to be infected with hepatitis C than any other age group, the Canadian Liver Foundation (CLF) released an informational cartoon video targeting …A 'silent killer': Hepatits C and boomersTaunton Daily GazetteOlympia Baby Boomers – Family Doctors Encourage Hepatitis C TestingThurstonTalkall 3 news articles » […]

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