Quantcast
Published On: Thu, Feb 12th, 2015

Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, full transcripts, history

Original work: Thomas Hicks (1823-1890, artist), Leopold Grozelier (1830-1865, lithographer), W. William Schaus (publisher), J.H. Bufford's Lith. (printer) - Restoration: Adam Cuerden

Original work: Thomas Hicks (1823-1890, artist), Leopold Grozelier (1830-1865, lithographer), W. William Schaus (publisher), J.H. Bufford’s Lith. (printer) – Restoration: Adam Cuerden

UPDATE: The comprehensive analysis on the speech can be best read at Abraham Lincoln Online

From 1965 to the present, The Gettysburg Address is considered the most famous speech ever given by President Abraham Lincoln.

There are five known copies of the speech in Lincoln’s handwriting, each detailed by the above source, housed in the Library of Congress, the White House, the Lincoln Memorial and one at Cornell University.

Each version, with their slight variations are named after the original recipient: Nicolay, Hay, Everett, Bancroft and Bliss.

This is the version in the Lincoln Room of the White House.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln

Visit Abraham Lincoln Online for more details

About the Author

- Writer and Co-Founder of The Global Dispatch, Brandon has been covering news, offering commentary for years, beginning professionally in 2003 on Crazed Fanboy before expanding into other blogs and sites. Appearing on several radio shows, Brandon has hosted Dispatch Radio, written his first novel (The Rise of the Templar) and completed the three years Global University program in Ministerial Studies to be a pastor. To Contact Brandon email [email protected] ATTN: BRANDON

Tags
Displaying 3 Comments
Have Your Say
  1. This Day in History: Abraham Lincoln delivers second inaugural address - The Global Dispatch says:

    […] the Gettysburg Address, the words are inscribed on the inner wall of the Lincoln Memorial. Here Lincoln points to Divine […]

  2. This Day in History: Happy birthday Abraham Lincoln, Bill Russell and Lorne Greene - The Global Dispatch says:

    […] Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, full transcripts, history […]

  3. Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, alternate versions - The Global Dispatch says:

    […] Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, full transcripts, history […]

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these html tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>



Recent Posts

Categories

Archives

At the Movies