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Published On: Fri, Feb 8th, 2013

3D printer generates viable human stem cells

Imagine if you could take living cells, load them into a printer, and squirt out a 3D tissue that could develop into a kidney or a heart.

Scientists are one step closer to that reality, now that they have developed the first printer for embryonic human stem cells.

In a new study, researchers from the University of Edinburgh have created a cell printer that spits out living embryonic stem cells.

Researchers have developed a 3D printer that prints human embryonic stem cells. (Dr Will Shu / Biofabrication)

Researchers have developed a 3D printer that prints human embryonic stem cells. (Dr Will Shu / Biofabrication)

The printer was capable of printing uniform-size droplets of cells gently enough to keep the cells alive and maintain their ability to develop into different cell types.

The new printing method could be used to make 3D human tissues for testing new drugs, grow organs , or ultimately print cells directly inside the body.

Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are obtained from human embryos and can develop into any cell type in an adult person, from brain tissue to muscle to bone. This attribute makes them ideal for use in regenerative medicine — repairing, replacing and regenerating damaged cells, tissues or organs. [Stem Cells: 5 Fascinating Findings ]

In a lab dish, hESCs can be placed in a solution that contains the biological cues that tell the cells to develop into specific tissue types, a process called differentiation. The process starts with the cells forming what are called “embryoid bodies.”

Cell printers offer a means of producing embryoid bodies of a defined size and shape.

In the new study, the cell printer was made from a modified CNC machine (a computer-controlled machining tool) outfitted with two “bio-ink” dispensers: one containing stem cells in a nutrient-rich soup called cell medium and another containing just the medium. These embryonic stem cells were dispensed through computer-operated valves, while a microscope mounted to the printer provided a close-up view of what was being printed.

The two inks were dispensed in layers, one on top of the other to create cell droplets of varying concentration. The smallest droplets were only two nanoliters, containing roughly five cells.

The cells were printed onto a dish containing many small wells. The dish was then flipped over so the droplets now hung from them, allowing the stem cells to form clumps inside each well. (The printer lays down the cells in precisely sized droplets and in a certain pattern that is optimal for differentiation.)

Tests revealed that more than 95 percent of the cells were still alive 24 hours after being printed, suggesting they had not been killed by the printing process.

More than 89 percent of the cells were still alive three days later, and also tested positive for a marker of their pluripotency — their potential to develop into different cell types.

More leisure reading on the topic, click here

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About the Author

- Writer and Co-Founder of The Global Dispatch, Brandon has been covering news for Examiner, starting and writing for several different websites including the diverse blognews site Desk of Brian. To Contact Brandon email [email protected] ATTN: BRANDON

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Have Your Say
  1. [...] of making a gun from your home printer. Now if that wasn't weird enough, consider this: human stem cells from your printer. It's not a weird sci-fi movie; it's real and scientists are hoping that it could be the [...]

  2. [...] Go here to read the rest: 3D printer generates viable human stem cells – The Global Dispatch [...]

  3. [...] See original article: 3D printer generates viable human stem cells – The Global Dispatch [...]

  4. Interested says:

    Hmm…I would say the tag line was misleading as the printer did not, in any way, generate the cells. What it did was lay them down in a set pattern. So, yes, while it is a 3D printer and it used the stem cells as it’s printing medium, no it did not “generate” them. Interesting, but please don’t mislead people with outrageous statements.

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